HISTORY OF HALLOWEEN

Wednesday, July 06, 2016

 
 
 
 
Halloween is a holiday celebrated on the night of October 31.  The word Halloween is a shortening of All Hallows' Evening also known as Hallowe'en or All Hallows' Eve.
 
 
 
Traditional activities include trick-or-treating, bonfires, costume parties, visiting "haunted houses" and carving jack-o-lanterns. Irish and Scottish immigrants carried versions of the tradition to North America in the nineteenth century. Other western countries embraced the holiday in the late twentieth century including Ireland, the United States, Canada, Puerto Rico and the United Kingdom as well as of Australia and New Zealand.
 
Halloween has its origins in the ancient Celtic festival known as Samhain (pronounced "sah-win"). 
The festival of Samhain is a celebration of the end of the harvest season in Gaelic culture. Samhain was a time used by the ancient pagans to take stock of supplies and prepare for winter. The ancient Gaels believed that on October 31, the boundaries between the worlds of the living and the dead overlapped and the deceased would come back to life and cause havoc such as sickness or damaged crops.
 
The festival would frequently involve bonfires. It is believed that the fires attracted insects to the area which attracted bats to the area. These are additional attributes of the history of Halloween.
 
Masks and costumes were worn in an attempt to mimic the evil spirits or appease them.
 

Halloween is a holiday celebrated on the night of October 31.  The word Halloween is a shortening of All Hallows' Evening also known as Hallowe'en or All Hallows' Eve.

 

Traditional activities include trick-or-treating, bonfires, costume parties, visiting "haunted houses" and carving jack-o-lanterns. Irish and Scottish immigrants carried versions of the tradition to North America in the nineteenth century. Other western countries embraced the holiday in the late twentieth century including Ireland, the United States, Canada, Puerto Rico and the United Kingdom as well as of Australia and New Zealand. Halloween has its origins in the ancient Celtic festival known as Samhain (pronounced "sah-win"). The festival of Samhain is a celebration of the end of the harvest season in Gaelic culture. Samhain was a time used by the ancient pagans to take stock of supplies and prepare for winter. The ancient Gaels believed that on October 31, the boundaries between the worlds of the living and the dead overlapped and the deceased would come back to life and cause havoc such as sickness or damaged crops.

 

  The festival would frequently involve bonfires. It is believed that the fires attracted insects to the area which attracted bats to the area. These are additional attributes of the history of Halloween.

Masks and costumes were worn in an attempt to mimic the evil spirits or appease them.

HAVE YOU MET TALMADGE?

Wednesday, July 06, 2016

Talmadge? Talmadge who?
 
 
 
That is a very good question. Some of you who follow Mr Burch and my personal Facebook page may have noticed some posts including a well-dressed (most of the time) mannequin we have named Talmadge. Where did he come from? He was hiding in the warehouse, deep in our shipping department. Amongst all the other mannequins he was the one with a smile on his face and a 3 inch layer of dust covering his entire form. The idea came to me while making plans to take a vacation to Gatlinburg, Tennesse. Why not take a mannequin with me and not only show the beautiful sites but also showcase some of the great looking tuxedos and suits Mr Burch has in inventory? The plan was in motion.
 
 
 
The name Talmadge was my Grandfather’s name and seemed appropriate, meshing an old name with the world today. It is also a very unique name that people will not forget. 
 
 
 
Once I got approval from the bosses, which took a little convincing, I was quick to put in tuxedo orders for Talmadge to wear on our trip. Trying to explain to my family that I would be bringing a mannequin with me on our trip was met with laughter and a couple of “have you lost your mind?” looks. After I explained the idea they were more receptive but still had their reservations. I was especially worried that Talmadge might scare my nephew, 5, and my nieces, 4 and 1. Surprisingly they found him quite interesting and fun and helped me with him. The looks that I received as I was walking down the sidewalk in Gatlinburg are priceless and a huge thanks to my sister, Mary Dillard, for doing most of the photography.
 
 
 
We had a blast with him on our trip. We went to the Smoky Mountain National Park, The Apple Barn, downtown Gatlinburg, and many other places. (See Facebook for our family vacay photos.)
 
 
 
Since our trip he has been relaxing for a bit but he has plans on visiting local businesses, landmarks, and other wedding vendors. Where will he be next? Who knows. He might show up at your door soon. 
 
 
 
Would you like Talmadge to visit you?  Let us know.